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20

Dec

COUNSELLING BLOG: 8 Ways to be more productive with less effort

onlinecounsellingcollege:

1.Sort out your priorities. Make time to honestly reflect on your life, and to think about what is important to you. Where are you going? What do you want? What are the steps that will take you there?

2. Focus on the essential tasks. Next, think about your short term responsibilities. Ask…

Rant On Life: Why School Is So Important To Me (and other revelations)

shesgotwhatittakes:

Attending school and getting good grades has been a top priority for me for my entire life. I despise missing a single class or day of school, be it for illness, vacation, or even extracurricular field trips. I always try my hardest, going above and beyond on almost every project and and…

25 of the Happiest Words in English

mentalflossr:

image

Isabel Kloumann and a group of mathematicians at the University of Vermont published a paper on positivity in the English language. They rated just over 10,000 of the most frequent words from a variety of sources (Twitter, Google Books, The New York Times, and music lyrics).

So what are the happiest words in English? Continue reading…

The AfroTeacher: Where are the educators of color?

theafroteacher:

I have no doubt that we are in the front lines, doing what we can where we are with what we have, but it is an anomaly to me as to why there are plenty of contemporary black doctors, lawyers, engineers, athletes, and everything else that people can name off the top of their heads….

and no one can…

Every Day

christinamused:

Be a lamp, a lifeboat, or a ladder.

—Rumi

An early childhood surrounded by books and educational toys will leave positive fingerprints on a person’s brain well into their late teens, a two-decade-long research study has shown.
~The Guardian, “Childhood stimulation key to brain development, study finds” (via reborn-pure)
from-student-to-teacher:

This is a great reminder to kids (and their parents) about why that daily reading is important. It adds up!

from-student-to-teacher:

This is a great reminder to kids (and their parents) about why that daily reading is important. It adds up!

27

Nov

theartguy:

(via Free Technology for Teachers: Social Media for Teachers)

[T]here are many over-weight, hard-drinking, cigarette-smoking senior citizens. But no one seriously uses these exceptions to the rule to suggest that it is perfectly all right to eat, drink, and smoke as much as one wants. Public policies about eating, drinking, and smoking are made on the basis of the general case, not the exceptions to those cases. This is not so in education.

For reasons that are hard to fathom, too many people believe that in education the exceptions are the rule. Presidents and politicians of both parties are quick to point out the wonderful but occasional story of a child’s rise from poverty to success and riches. They also often proudly recite the heroic, remarkable, but occasional impact of a teacher or a school on a child. These stories of triumph by individuals who were born poor, or success by educators who changed the lives of their students are widely believed narratives about our land and people, celebrated in the press, on television and in the movies. But in fact, these are simply myths that help us feel good to be American. These stories of success reflect real events, and thus they are certainly worth studying and celebrating so we might learn more about how they occur. But the general case is that poor people stay poor and that teachers and schools serving impoverished youth do not often succeed in changing the life chances for their students. America’s dirty little secret is that a large majority of poor kids attending schools that serve the poor are not going to have successful lives. Reality is not nearly as comforting as myths. Reality does not make us feel good. But the facts are clear. Most children born into the lower social classes will not make it out of that class, even when exposed to heroic educators.

David C Berliner, “Sorting out the effects of inequality and poverty, teachers and schooling, on America’s youth” (via properbookwork)

Creativity in Education and Why it Matters

holtthink:

Think about this next time you are drilling your kids on how to pass the standardized test:

From the press release:

Eighty-eight Percent of U.S. Professionals Surveyed Believe Creativity Should be Built into Standard Curricula

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Nov. 7, 2012  Creative thinking deserves a much higher priority in education curricula, according to college-educated professionals surveyed in new research released today by Adobe. The U.S. study,Creativity and Education: Why it Matters, sheds new light on the role of creativity in career success and the growing belief that creativity is not just a personality trait, but a learned skill. Based on the study, 85% percent of respondents agree creative thinking is critical for problem solving in their career, and 68% of respondents believe creativity is a skill that can be learned. Nearly three-quarters (71%) say creative thinking should be “taught as a class – like math or science.”

The research is based on interviews with a nationally representative sample of 1,000 full-time salaried workers ages 25 and older with at least a four-year college degree.

“Around the world, educators are already fostering creative thinking with their students,” said Jon Perera, vice president of education, Adobe. “What this study is telling us is that we need to empower and accelerate this shift. Creativity is a critical competency that should be taught within all disciplines. This will drive the global economy and the career success of the next generation.”

Creativity is Key to Career Success 
Almost nine out of 10 professionals overwhelmingly agree that creativity is required for economic growth, and is valuable to society (96%). Additionally, 78% say it is important in their career. Yet, 32% don’t feel comfortable thinking creatively in their career, and a large majority (78%) wishes they had more creative ability. When asked to define creativity, the majority of respondents (66%) say they associate creative thinking with “thinking out of the box,” or “the ability to come up with innovative ideas.”

Education Concerns
The study points to a growing awareness – especially among professionals – that creativity and creative thinking deserve a bigger role in education. Ninety-one percent agree there is more to preparing for success in school than learning subjects, and 82% wish they had more exposure to creative thinking as students. Fifty-seven percent of professionals believed creativity would be important to their career while they were in college, compared to the 78% who believe it is important to their career now. Seventy-two percent say they were more focused on course subject material when they were in school than on creative thinking. Among education majors, 75% viewed creative thinking as important to their career while they were in college and 48% say it currently has a place in their career.

Interestingly, science (69%) and math (59%) ranked nearly as high as traditional creative subjects like art (79%), music (76%), and drama (65%) in contributing to creative thinking.

About the “Creativity and Education: Why it Matters” Study
The data points referenced above come from a study commissioned by Adobe, produced by research firm Edelman Berland and conducted as an online survey among a nationally representative sample of 1,000 Americans, ages 25+ who are college-educated and full-time salaried employees. Interviewing took place from October 17 - 19, 2012. The margin of error is +/-3.1%.

For more information on the research results visit Adobe Creativity and Education: Why it Matters study and Adobe Creativity and Adobe Creativity and Education: Why it Matters infographic.

Cheating scandal: Feds say teachers hired stand-in to take their certification tests

infoneer-pulse:

It was a brazen and surprisingly long-lived scheme, authorities said, to help aspiring public school teachers cheat on the tests they must pass to prove they are qualified to lead their classrooms.

For 15 years, teachers in three Southern states paid Clarence Mumford Sr. — himself a longtime educator — to send someone else to take the tests in their place, authorities said. Each time, Mumford received a fee of between $1,500 and $3,000 to send one of his test ringers with fake identification to the Praxis exam. In return, his customers got a passing grade and began their careers as cheaters, according to federal prosecutors in Memphis.

Authorities say the scheme affected hundreds — if not thousands — of public school students who ended up being taught by unqualified instructors.

» via NBC News

Best Plagiarism Checker

amandaonwriting:

Avoid plagiarism by checking your texts against over 2 billion documents.

17

Nov

tribunegraphics:

School truancy: Graphic showing how students with disabilities are missing more days, part of a series

tribunegraphics:

School truancy: Graphic showing how students with disabilities are missing more days, part of a series

gjmueller:


When we talk about game-based learning, what do we really mean? How is it different from the games you’ve been incorporating in your classroom all these years? In general, game-based learning means making gaming a deeper, more intrinsic part of the learning process.

What’s your take on the game-based learning trend?

gjmueller:

When we talk about game-based learning, what do we really mean? How is it different from the games you’ve been incorporating in your classroom all these years? In general, game-based learning means making gaming a deeper, more intrinsic part of the learning process.

What’s your take on the game-based learning trend?

world-shaker:

Popular Educational Twitter Hashtags

world-shaker:

Popular Educational Twitter Hashtags